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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Flowering Spurge

Euphorbia corollata

The long-lasting blooms of flowering spurge appear in mid to late summer and last well into the fall. The 3′ stalks of whorled leaves are topped with sprays of minute flowers surrounded by petal-like bracts, as is characteristic of spurges.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Sandhills Bog Lily

Lilium pyrophilum

Sandhills bog lily is endemic to the Sandhills region of South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. There it grows almost exclusively between dry longleaf pine uplands and wet steam banks.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Carolina Birds-in-a-Nest

Macbridea caroliniana

Native to Carolina bogs and marshes, this distinctive plant slowly spreads to create a colony of curious purplish-pink blooms. The clumps of these “open-mouthed” flowers—like baby birds crying for food—gave rise to the common name. This rare member of the mint family thrives in sunny bogs and blooms in the heat of August.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Purple-Flower Pinkroot

Spigelia gentianoides

An incredibly rare and little-understood plant, purple-flower pinkroot is endemic to small areas in Alabama and the Florida panhandle. This plant lives in fire-dependent open woodland habitats. Purple-flower pinkroot was listed as a federally endangered species in 1990.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Cardinal Flower

Lobelia cardinalis

Cardinal flower is a sure bet for gardeners anxious to have hummingbirds visit their gardens. Stream banks, water’s edge, meadow margins, and garden soils less prone to drought stress are excellent sites to grow this impressive herbaceous perennial.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Dwarf Scullcap

Scutellaria parvula

This diminutive member of the mint family (Lamiaceae) is mostly found in sunny, calcereous areas of the Midwest. The small flowers bloom from mid to late summer and attract a variety of smaller bees including mason and halictid bees.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Northern Wild Senna

Senna hebecarpa

An interesting member of the pea family (Fabaceae), northern wild senna blooms in late summer and attracts bees to its pollen-laden yellow blooms, while ants and ladybeetles are attracted to its extra-floral nectaries. Northern wild senna does well in rich, loamy soil and full sun, but will tolerate partial sun and rockier soil.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Whorled Rosinweed

Silphium trifoliatum var. trifoliatum

This very tall grassland plant with joyful canary-yellow blooms is found in most Mid-Atlantic states east of the Mississippi, though it is rare in parts of its range. Endemic to prairies, this plant favors bright sun and well-drained soils.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

New York Ironweed

Vernonia noveboracensis

New York ironweed is a robust wildflower with saturated-violet and narrow petaled flowers. Normally found in nature in wet swales, Vernonia novaboracensis also grows well in drier sites in the garden without extra care.

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What's in bloom:

What's in bloom:

Prairie Wood Aster

Eurybia hemispherica

Prairie wood aster has a strong presence in the summer garden with its showy masses of violet-blue flowers with yellow centers, displayed on wiry stems. It is suitable for the perennial border or in a meadow garden.

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